Alexey Voevoda: “I was thrown out of the bobsled at high speed – and I hit my shoulder on the concrete wall”

Alexey Voevoda: "I was thrown out of the bobsled at high speed - and I hit my shoulder on the concrete wall"
Alexey Voevoda: “I was thrown out of the bobsled at high speed – and I hit my shoulder on the concrete wall” │Source: armsport-rus.ru

Originalarmsport-rus.ru Google Translate:

” Alexei Voyevoda: I was thrown out of the bean at high speed – and I hit my shoulder on the concrete wall
 Tomorrow, 26 January, at the World Cup bobsled and skeleton in St. Moritz (Switzerland) will start the tournament men in twos. Two-time Olympic medalist clocked Alexei Voyevoda perform in a carriage with a young pilot Alexei Stulnevym. About recovering from an injury at the European Championships in Igls (Austria), Alexei Voyevoda told special correspondent portal TEAM RUSSIA-2014 Elena Golovenskih.

– Injury, hopefully not serious, but his shoulder still hurts, – said Alexei Voyevoda. – In training, ran through the pain.

– So, after all, was in Igls?

– During the training sessions in the four I was thrown out of the bean at high speed – and I hit my shoulder on the concrete wall. On the track in front of the counter-braking bias is a feature: if a certain degree out of a bend, the rear accelerates can throw. After all, he has to loosen his grip to start stopping the projectile. That happened (laughs).Well, my legs have been linked with the third clocked, so completely out of the bean I dropped out. Bruised shoulder – the minimum. I hope that nothing catastrophic happened.

– You’ll start tomorrow?

– Yes. In the two-man team will speak with the pilot Alexei Stulnevym. Footwork on my injury does not affect (smiling).

– Head coach of Russia Alexander Shcheglovsky said that of the four you will act in a carriage Dmitry Abramovich.

– Do not want to think. Will be the day – and the food will be. Tomorrow the first two runs in twos all show.


Source: “The team of Russia-2014” 

Original – armsport-rus.ru │ Google Translate